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Atlanta’s best example of Frank Lloyd Wright architecture – for sale for $950,000

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Shortly after Robert Green returned to his Georgia home from his 1958-1959 apprenticeship at Taliesin West (Frank Lloyd Wright’s school), he designed then supervised the construction of a remarkable house for a C&S Bank executive named William Copeland and his family in 1960.

That remarkable house is now for sale for $950,000.00. Jason Wieloch and I are co-listing the property.

“Nobody buys a Wright house by mistake or coincidence” said Ron Scherubel, the retired Executive Director of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy.

Ron also said that the market for a Wright house “is a narrow market. It’s an active market. And it can be a lucrative market…most of the time, buyers pay a 25 to 40 percent premium because it’s a Wright design.”

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Usonian design is Mr. Wright’s coined term for his simple style that enabled the integration of structure with the natural order of the landscape.

The Copeland House typifies Usonian design.

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Robert Green, a native Georgian, mastered geometric, modular, accessible construction. With The Copeland House in 1960, he truly fused artisan real estate with an urban, natural landscape as his first “post-Wright” project.

The Copeland House is private, and sited on a lush property that brings the outside in with extensive, glassy grandeur.

Robert Green also completed an addition in 1987, and ASID member, Herbert Brito led a comprehensive renovation of the house in 1998.

Mr. Green’s return created an upstairs study/den/office by enclosing a porch above the 2 car carport.

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Mr. Brito’s renovation project won an award from the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation. He created a new kitchen, bath and master bedroom within the existing space configuration. “Georgia’s best example of Wrightian, mid-century modern architecture.”

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The Copeland House demonstrates the vital influence of Frank Lloyd Wright on Robert Green with low sloped roofs, bold, cantilevered overhangs, open living spaces , a central chimney, variable ceiling heights and abundant use of redwood, cypress wood, brick  and glass.

The dentate mouldings, built in furniture and elegant fixtures reveal a timeless quality that exists with so few houses. The renovations from 1998 are a classic, wholesale update that complements all of the original features and design elements.

The house for sale today has so many dramatic and adorable features. This week, I’ll write a few articles that discuss the highlights in more detail!

Comments

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  2. Touche. Great arguments. Keep up the good work.

  3. hobgoblin238 says:

    Brito was a fag who did NOTHING in addition to my father’s work. He put a couple of chairs that looked like they came from K-mart in there and gets awards while my father got shit.

    Robert Green designed the house. ALONE. He deserved awards.

Trackbacks

  1. Atlanta says:

    [...]    Wright’s work was celebrated for its uniquely American “Prairie” style with its low-profile form integrated with the landscape. A major triumph for Wright occurred when his newly built Imperial Hotel in Tokyo survived the great earthquake of 1923. An apprentice designed this 1960 Atlanta home in Collier Hills. [...]

  2. Atlanta says:

    [...] Wright’s work was celebrated for its uniquely American “Prairie” style with its low-profile form integrated with the landscape. A major triumph for Wright occurred when his newly built Imperial Hotel in Tokyo survived the great earthquake of 1923. An apprentice designed this 1960 Atlanta home in Collier Hills. [...]

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